Category Archives: poetry

March/April 2017 Writing Contests

Here’s another useful list of contests from Rachel Poli!

Rachel Poli

march-april-2017-writing-contestsMarch 2017

Genre: Poetry
Theme: Food
Website: Literal Latte
Deadline: March 15, 2017
Entry Fee: $10 for up 6 poems or $15 for up to 12 poems
Prize: First place – $500

Genre: Fiction and Nonfiction
Theme: None
Website: Narrative Magazine
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $25
Prize: First place – $2,500

Genre: Fiction
Theme: None
Website: Colorado Review
Deadline: March 14, 2017
Entry Fee: $15 – snail mail, $17 – online submission
Prize: First – $2,000

Genre: Fiction
Theme: None
Website: Fabula Press
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: $10
Prize: First – $250

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: My Kind of America
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

Genre: Nonfiction
Theme: Step Outside Your Comfort Zone
Website: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: March 31, 2017
Entry Fee: None
Prize: $200

April 2017

Genre: Fiction or poetry
Theme: None
Website:

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Don’t Forget: Green River Writers Contest Open Until Sept. 30!

Green River Writers Logo

Poetry and Prose Categories, Low Entry Fees, Cash Prizes! For information, click on the image or email contest@greenriverwriters.org

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Motivate Yourself by Submitting to a Writing Contest

Here’s a new list of contests you might find helpful, from the writers at Live to Write—Write to Live. Check it out!

Live to Write - Write to Live

Today’s post is as much for me as it is for you. You see, I’ve been quite lethargic about writing fiction lately, as my business has been so pleasantly busy that I don’t have time to write for fun.

I put don’t have time in italics, since, we all know that we make time for what is important to us. I do have time. I have the same amount of time as everyone else and if I truly want to write fiction, I will find a way.EnterWritingContests

Today’s post is my self-motivation for finding that way.

Submitting to contests is a great way to be inspired to write, to actually write, and to actually submit. I’ve done it. I know it’s always fun and challenging and a unique way to get the must to come out and play.

My all-time-favorite contests are the quarterly 24-hour contests by WritersWeekly.com

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January/February 2016 Writing Contests

Wish there were more contests for novels or parts of novels! If you have lists of these, please share!

Rachel Poli

January February Writing Contests 2016January 2016

Type: Narrative Travel Writing
Hosted by: Transitions Abroad
Deadline: January 15, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Fiction
Hosted by: Literal Latte
Deadline: January 15, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Power of Gratitude
Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: January 15, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Short Short Story
Hosted By: Writer’s Digest
Deadline: January 15, 2016
Entry Fee: $25

Type: Fiction or Poetry
Hosted by: Dream Quest One
Deadline: January 24, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Spirit of America
Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul
Deadline: January 30, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Fiction
Hosted by: Chicago Tribune
Deadline: January 31, 2016
Entry Fee: None

Type: Short Memoir
Hosted by: Fish Publishing
Deadline: January 31, 2016
Entry Fee: $16

February 2016

Type: Poetry and/or Short Story
Hosted by: Westmoreland
Deadline: February 16, 2016
Entry Fee: $10

Type: Flash Fiction
Hosted By: Fish Publishing
Deadline: February…

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How to Build Beats and Style in Your Writing!

Found this terrific piece on cadence and beats at the sentence level on Writers in the Storm. I especially like the rhetorical devicesTypewriter and flowers guest blogger Margie Lawson provides. As a rhetorician, I’ve encountered many of these in my research, and I’ve used many, even if only intuitively, in my writing.

I’ve written about some of these in my Novel First Lines series, and in my post on the effects of commas on cadence. Meter and rhythm are powerful lures in the first lines of a book or story. For a wonderful discussion of rhythm and cadence as persuasive devices, check out Martha Kolln’s textbook (find used copies), Rhetorical Grammar.

See if you use any already—and what you can learn to use.

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THE STORY OF GREEN RIVER WRITERS: History of a Successful Writing Group

This is the second post in the story of Green River Writers, a long-lived, successful writers’ group based in Louisville, Kentucky. In my last post, I introduced the president and founder, Mary “Ernie” O’Dell, and shared a little of her writing journey. Today I’m sharing the story of Green River Writers: how it started and why it’s thrived so long.River in Kentucky

First Days

The group was born shortly after Ernie met her second husband, Jim (she calls him her “real husband”).

We were both writers; he was living in North Carolina and I was living in Louisville—and there were no writers in my life except him and a few people that I met at writers’ conferences, so I thought, by golly, I need some other writers. So I called up a few of the people that I knew that wrote, and I said, let’s get together. Jim came up from North Carolina for a four-day weekend at Rough River State Park in Kentucky. We decided to have a real retreat in the summer of that year, 1986, I believe, and we couldn’t find housing cheap enough for all us poor people, so we rented a girls’ dormitory at Campbellsville College in Campbellsville, Kentucky, for a week at $5 a night per room. We changed from Rough River to Green River because the Green River flows right through Campbellsville.

At that time, we had 12 or 15 members. Campbellsville College (University now) was fairly conservative; they frowned upon us having men and women in the same building, much less on the same corridor. I went into the office and said, “I need to make something clear to you. When we come here, we no longer have men and woman, we have writers, and there are times when are up all night, there are times we need to consult with a fellow writer, and we don’t want to have to go down a floor or to a different building, so please put us all on the same corridor,” and they did. But they were watching us carefully. I got called on the carpet because downstairs in the public restroom, someone had left a beer can. I said, “Are we the only people in this building?” and they said, “Well, no,” and I said, “Well, we didn’t do it.” Another time someone went outside to smoke and came back and exhaled smoke into the hallway and they called me on the carpet for that. So I had to be righteously indignant many times while we were there.Eyeglasses and pen

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